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Inhales, exhales -- is there more to our breathing than just these two sides of the breath? Yes! I like to notice the four "parts" of your breathing: inhale, transition, exhale, transition.
 

What’s in this episode of moved to heal?

I introduce the "four parts" of breathing in two ways.

The first way is to notice what's already happening:

  • there's an inhale
  • then there's a moment of transition between inhale and exhale
  • then there's an exhale
  • and then another moment of transition between exhale and inhale

The second way is to try engaging with these four parts where you choose. Here are a few options:

  • allowing fuller or longer inhales and exhales
  • allowing more pause in the transition
  • creating an even rhythm between inhale and exhale

I guide you through this practice step by step, and you can choose to skip or stay with any area you like. You can do this Moved to Heal practice while reclining, seated, standing, or moving.

 

Integration suggestion

After listening to the episode, perhaps take a moment to check in: did you notice something that you want to remember or follow up on? If yes, maybe jot it down in a notebook or record a voice memo to help you remember.

 

You can give it a try when you're ready

Listen to "4 part breathing" on Spreaker.

Be moving, be true, be you
esther
 
 

photo credit ashim d silva on unsplash

Breathing happens with and without our conscious input. For example, most of the time we can consciously take a "deep" or "full" breath when we desire. This is just one way of engaging with our breathing. This practice is about tapping into that conscious engagement.

 

What’s in this episode of moved to heal?/h6>
In this practice, I'm inviting you to engage with your breathing by directing your breath attention to four different areas of your torso. When put all together, these four areas comprise what I'm calling a 360 degree breath. You can do or not do any of the practices, and in whatever manner or degree you choose.

The idea behind the 360 breath is to help guide your breathing to expand into areas its not used to going. I think of this as a follow up to bringing awareness to where your breathing *is* comfortable. If you're not sure about what is and isn't comfortable for you, I suggest you use this practice as a sort of "check in" --or start with the "observing your breathing" episode.
 

The 4 areas of 360 breathing
  • belly / abdomen
  • upper chest + back
  • lower ribs / middle torso
  • back (from waist to shoulders)

I guide you through this practice step by step, and you can choose to skip or stay with any area you like. You can do this Moved to Heal practice while reclining, seated, standing, or moving.

 

Integration suggestion

After listening to the episode, perhaps take a moment to check in: did you notice something that you want to remember or follow up on? If yes, maybe jot it down in a notebook or record a voice memo to help you remember.

 

You can give it a try when you're ready

Listen to "360 degree breathing" on Spreaker.

Be moving, be true, be you
esther
 
 

photo credit aynaz shahtale on unsplash

Where breathing sometimes overwhelms my practice of Hum Sa kriya, I find the opposite to be true with Sat Yam kriya: breathing always leads me in to the kriya technique in an effortless way. But that's just me! Your experience may be different, similar, or not really even in the same ballpark!
 

What’s in this episode?

Before teaching Sat Yam kriya, I share my experience with breathing and Sat Yam kriya (in the How To episode) -- and what I mean by "being led by breathing."

 

How can you use this practice?

You might try this practice to bring attention to how your breathing does or doesn't play a role in your meditation practice (and if you tuned in last week, perhaps compare with your experience in Hum Sa kriya).

I also love Sat Yam kriya for feeling connected to something bigger than me -- even just the literal space around me, wherever I am.

Give it a try when you're ready

SPREAKER EMBED

 
Be moving, be true,
esther
 
 

photo credit anthony rampersad on unsplash

When you're moving, there's lots to pay attention to -- what's going through your head, the moves you're doing, the sensations you feel -- which makes noticing your breathing just one of a long list of things you can that we can be aware of while moving. This week, I invite you to try choosing the breath.

 

What’s in this episode of moved to heal?

I invite you to observe your breathing while moving. You can move through "cat/cow" or in any way you choose.

You can do this Moved to Heal practice while seated or on hands and knees (for cat/cow) or from any starting place you choose.

"Cat/cow" is a movement of the spine or trunk. Cat rounds the spine, cow arches/backbends the spine.

 

Integration suggestion

After listening to the episode, perhaps take a moment to check in: did you notice something that you want to remember or follow up on? If yes, maybe jot it down in a notebook or record a voice memo to help you remember.

 

You can give it a try when you're ready

Listen to "observing breathing while moving" on Spreaker.

Be moving, be true, be you
esther
 
 

photo credit dave hoefler on unsplash

If you've been with me for a while, you've probably heard me go on and on about the magic of our breathing. I'm fascinated by how it works anatomically, and how it transforms our moment to moment experience in feeling. When it comes to meditation, breathing is a tremendous aid and, sometimes, a bit overpowering...
 

What’s in this episode?

We're returning to the practice of Hum Sa kriya this week, and in the How To, I talk about what happens when your breathing becomes the primary focus -- instead of the kriya (the "focusing mind action"). Fair warning, for some of you, hearing about this possibility may create it where it was not an issue before! So feel free to skip if you're not particularly curious.

 

After practicing

If you are curious, you might check in after your practice: how did breathing participate? What held your focus most easily: the kriya or breathing? Neither is right or wrong (despite my framing breathing as getting in the way), just different practices. Which do you prefer?

Give it a try when you're ready

Listen to "Ep 496 - Breathing Choice + Hum Sa Kriya Meditation" on Spreaker.

 
Be moving, be true,
esther
 
 

photo credit daniil silantev on unsplash

What’s in this episode of moved to heal?

Observing breathing is simple in concept and can be a whole variety of things in practice, including simple, difficult, complicated, emotional, and more.

In this episode, I invite you to observe your breathing in any way you choose, and offer 3 different options you can try. For each, I describe the option and then give you about a minute of quiet in which to practice. You can do or not do any of the practices, and in whatever manner or degree you choose.

 

The 3 breath observation options I offer
  • to notice the length of your inhale and exhale
  • to notice the movement of your breathing
  • to notice the sound of your breathing

You can do this Moved to Heal practice while reclining, seated, standing, or moving.

 

Integration suggestion

After listening to the episode, perhaps take a moment to check in: did you notice something that you want to remember or follow up on? If yes, maybe jot it down in a notebook or record a voice memo to help you remember.

 

You can give it a try when you're ready

Listen to "observing breathing" on Spreaker.

Be moving, be true, be you
esther
 
 

photo credit aleksander solberg on unsplash

Making the sounds of A-U-M kriya can be deeply soothing to your nervous system --all the more so when you think about the role your breathing plays.
 

What’s in this episode?

AUM kriya meditation! In this version, I invite you to imagine your "breath" in different locations in your torso -- lower, middle, and upper thirds. This is so we can imagine the sounds "Ahh" "Ooo" and "Mmm" as originating both from the breath and from these areas of the torso. It's maybe not as weird as it sounds in writing 😉

 

How can you use this practice?

If making sound is not something you think about, but just do, this practice may help you bring some intention into your chanting. And I find the meditation practice very grounding - good for when you feel less than steady in your body or mind.
 

Give it a try when you're ready

 
Listen to "Ep 483 - Breathing Sound and AUM Meditation".
 
Be moving, be true,
esther
 
 

photo credit artur luckza on unsplash

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